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Can Design be Genderless? by Madeleine Morley, AIGA

"New ideas are easy to conceive and spread like bush fire. Conversely, change is painful to implement and tiresome to follow through. For this reason, it is 2016 and one of Australia’s leading design universities still teaches its first year students that women prefer pastels in their FMCGs."

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No UI is the new UI by Tony Aube

"When AI becomes more prevalent, it could be imagined that intention alone could trigger actions and solutions to our problems. What will we design then?"

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March 24, 2017, 11:51 p.m.— Jane Connory

Do you think you could look at a piece of design and get a sense of the gender of the person who created it? Or a sense of the gender distribution of the people in the collaborative effort involved? I somethings think you can - sometimes not. Test yourself on an AGDA annual and see how you go.

Knowing our own unconscious biases and our ability to empathise with a user can really be affected by our social conditioning and gender – sometimes for good and sometimes for bad. I think students need to be taught a sense of self-awareness to begin using this force for good – not taught to "shrink it and pink it" for women. Urgh!

On—Can Design be Genderless? by Madeleine Morley, AIGA

Jan. 27, 2017, 10:56 a.m.— Please explain

"Before screens, we made axe heads. After screens, we'll make something else. But we're not supposed to know what that is right now."

This is lost on me

On—No UI is the new UI by Tony Aube

Jan. 27, 2017, 10:53 a.m.— Sarah Milne

I learned "gender design" at uni, only 6 years ago. At the time, I couldn't articulate why I felt uncomfortable using pinks and flowers the script type — I am a woman and I didn't enjoy any of those things. But at the time, all you can articulate is "this feels stupid".

Times are changing!

On—Can Design be Genderless? by Madeleine Morley, AIGA

Feb. 5, 2016, 1:46 p.m.— Bonnie

Is it purely experiential? Is there a flow and response-interface that contains best practices and cognitive "handshakes"? Does the designer have the role that forever adjusts and adapts for a "second nature" experience?

Or perhaps, the designer takes on more environmental role. While the screenless AI takes care of the function, the designer sets the environment in which it all happens. And I don't mean an interior designer, a mean a digital/physical life intersection guide...

Designers are supposed to know about humans and how to make connections with them.

I don't know - im just answering your question with my own questions and made up terms.

On—No UI is the new UI by Tony Aube

Feb. 5, 2016, 1:09 p.m.— Jemi

Yeah exactly Bonnie - How do our design practices and ideas change in the face of dramatically new interfaces and technologies. What does a "Designer's" process look like when considering the best way to build an AI for instance?

On—No UI is the new UI by Tony Aube

Feb. 5, 2016, 1:04 p.m.— Kate

Before screens, we made axe heads. After screens, we'll make something else. But we're not supposed to know what that is right now.

On—No UI is the new UI by Tony Aube

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